What’s the world’s most natural word?

| Linda Brown | Humanity

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Like some of you might have noticed the word ‘Mama’ appears in similar versions in most languages. That’s NOT a coincidence!

Mama is a reduplication of the sound ‘ma’, which is the universal baby talk when they want to breastfeed. That is to say, ‘Mama’, is an onomatopoeia – a word that phonetically imitates the sound that it describes – in this case, I’m hungry for milk! 

It does not get any more natural than that.

Be sure to share this post with your mother. She earned it!

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And or all of you onomatopoeia-enthusiasts, here is some more:

onomatopoeia is a word or phrase whose sound imitates its meaning.

The term describes both the use of day-to-day words as well as meaningful imitation sound in literature, rhetoric, and poetry.

Oddly, although a particular sound is heard similarly by people of different cultures, it is often expressed through the use of onomatopeias.

For example, the snip of a pair of scissors is cri-cri in Italian, riqui-riqui in Spanish,treque-treque in Portuguese, krits-krits in modern Greek, cëk-cëk in Albanian and katr-katr in Hindi.

Similarly, the “honk” of a car’s horn is ba-ba in Mandarin, tut-tut in French, pu-pu in Japanese, bbang-bbang in Korean, bært-bært in Norwegian, fom-fom in Portuguese and bim-bim in Vietnamese.

Amongst many onomatopoeia, you’ll probably recognize: Bang, Bark, Boo,Bump, Buzz, Cackle, Chatter, Cheer, Clap, Clank, Click, Crackle, Crash, Crunch, Ding-Dong, Drip, Eek, Fizz, Flipflop, haha, hiccup, honk, howl, hush, knock, meow, moan, moo, murmur, oink, plop, poof, pop, ring, roar, shhh, smash, smack, squish, swoosh, tick-tock, whisper, zip, zoom

And or all of you onomatopoeia-enthusiasts, here is some more:

onomatopoeia is a word or phrase whose sound imitates its meaning.

The term describes both the use of day-to-day words as well as meaningful imitation sound in literature, rhetoric, and poetry.

Oddly, although a particular sound is heard similarly by people of different cultures, it is often expressed through the use of onomatopeias.

For example, the snip of a pair of scissors is cri-cri in Italian, riqui-riqui in Spanish,treque-treque in Portuguese, krits-krits in modern Greek, cëk-cëk in Albanian and katr-katr in Hindi.

Similarly, the “honk” of a car’s horn is ba-ba in Mandarin, tut-tut in French, pu-pu in Japanese, bbang-bbang in Korean, bært-bært in Norwegian, fom-fom in Portuguese and bim-bim in Vietnamese.

Amongst many onomatopoeia, you’ll probably recognize: Bang, Bark, Boo,Bump, Buzz, Cackle, Chatter, Cheer, Clap, Clank, Click, Crackle, Crash, Crunch, Ding-Dong, Drip, Eek, Fizz, Flipflop, haha, hiccup, honk, howl, hush, knock, meow, moan, moo, murmur, oink, plop, poof, pop, ring, roar, shhh, smash, smack, squish, swoosh, tick-tock, whisper, zip, zoom