Why is the number 666 associated with the Devil?

| John Anderson | Religion

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If you haven’t figured that out, don’t feel bad about yourself, because deciphering this code requires extensive Bible knowledge, a master’s degree in Roman-Israelite history and a “black belt” in Gimatria – an ancient alphanumeric Hebrew code.  

It all goes back to one verse in the Book of Revelation: ‘One who understands can calculate the number of the beast, for it is a number that stands for a person. His number is six hundred and sixty-six’ (Rev. 13:18).

Mind you, the book of Revelation was written during the reign of the Roman Emperor Nero and soon after the Romans desecrated and destroyed the holy temple in Jerusalem.

And here lies in the code: The numeric value of ‘Nero’ in Hebrew is 666. Yap, Emperor Nero is the beast and devil. 

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And for those of you who want to know more about the devil, check this to learn how he is perceived in different religions:

 

In Judaism, the word ‘satan’ appears in the Bible for the first time in the meaning of ‘obstacle’ (“and the angel of the Lord will stand on his way to Satan”); and later as ‘enemy, “And the devil will rise up to Solomon, the Hadad the Edomite”. 

Later, in Chronicles, Satan appears as an independent figure and in his explicit name. But, for the most part, it is clear that Satan is subjected to God’s will and work on his behalf.

In summation, in Judaism, the word ‘devil means “divert out of the path”. It is his to try and divert men from the righteous way, to test them.

In Christianity, Satan is called ‘Lucifer’. In contrast to Judaism – where he usually appears as an angel subject to God’s will – in the New Testament Satan appears as a wicked and rebellious demon, waging war against human souls and world domination. As such he is the source of evil in the world.

 In the Vatican, there was a role called the ‘Devil’s Advocate’, and his job was to argue against canonization, by presenting the shortcomings and mistakes of the saintly candidate.

In Islam, the Devil’s name is Iblis (in Arabic: إبليس). Iblis is mentioned in the Qur’an by name 11 times, and several dozen more times in the nickname ‘Alshitan’ (in Arabic: الشيطان) and in the nickname “The Whisperer” (in Arabic: الوسواس) in exact transliteration: Aloesuas – can also be translated as incitement). The Arabic word for ‘devil’ (شيطان) refers in a broad sense to all the evil spirits who cooperate with Iblis, the devil’s head, but often describes Iblis himself. 

And for those of you who want to know more about the devil, check this to learn how he is perceived in different religions:

 

In Judaism, the word ‘satan’ appears in the Bible for the first time in the meaning of ‘obstacle’ (“and the angel of the Lord will stand on his way to Satan”); and later as ‘enemy, “And the devil will rise up to Solomon, the Hadad the Edomite”. 

Later, in Chronicles, Satan appears as an independent figure and in his explicit name. But, for the most part, it is clear that Satan is subjected to God’s will and work on his behalf.

In summation, in Judaism, the word ‘devil means “divert out of the path”. It is his to try and divert men from the righteous way, to test them.

In Christianity, Satan is called ‘Lucifer’. In contrast to Judaism – where he usually appears as an angel subject to God’s will – in the New Testament Satan appears as a wicked and rebellious demon, waging war against human souls and world domination. As such he is the source of evil in the world.

 In the Vatican, there was a role called the ‘Devil’s Advocate’, and his job was to argue against canonization, by presenting the shortcomings and mistakes of the saintly candidate.

In Islam, the Devil’s name is Iblis (in Arabic: إبليس). Iblis is mentioned in the Qur’an by name 11 times, and several dozen more times in the nickname ‘Alshitan’ (in Arabic: الشيطان) and in the nickname “The Whisperer” (in Arabic: الوسواس) in exact transliteration: Aloesuas – can also be translated as incitement). The Arabic word for ‘devil’ (شيطان) refers in a broad sense to all the evil spirits who cooperate with Iblis, the devil’s head, but often describes Iblis himself.