Was Napoleon always pro-France?

| David Lewis | History

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On the contrary, the French Emperor was not born French, but Corsican. In Fact, while in his mother’s womb both his parents fought against France as Corsicans. Moreover, in his youth, he bitterly hated the French and even aspired to serve in the British navy, France’s then-days nemesis!

Bonus fact: Napoleon did not speak French until he was nine years old when his parents sent him there for school. Till his last day, Napoleon spoke with a heavy Corsican accent and misspell many words in French. 

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Napoleon Bonaparte was France Caesar and one of the key figures to shape the 19th century. Napoleon was not only one of the greatest warlords in human history, but also one of its principal legislators. He founded the Code of Napoleon – France’s civil law – which laid the foundation for the entire west-European modern law. 

Bonaparte spread the advanced French Revolution ideas and ideals through his conquests; but, ironically, being a monarch suppressed them in France itself. 

He developed far-reaching military tactics and strategic ideas relevant even today.

Napoleon ruled France from 1799 to 1814, until he was forced to resign by UK-Russian-Prussian-Austrian coalition that conquered Paris. The coalition forces sent him to exile on the island of Elba. They allowed him to retain his royal title of ‘Emperor’ but determined that his empire would extend only to the 86sqm (224sqKm) island 

In 1815 Napoleon fled the island and marched on Paris. French military forces that were dispatched to arrest him happily joined their admired Emperor. Napoleon was joined by many former soldiers and volunteers. On March 20, 1815, he regained his crown.

100 days later, on June 18, 1815, the French army was defeated again by the European coalition, thus ending – this time for good – Napoleon’s rule. 

The British decided not to take any risks this time and sent Napoleon to the remote island of St. Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean, some 2,000 kilometers off the coast of Africa. There, Napoleon spent the rest of his life on that island. 

Napoleon Bonaparte was France Caesar and one of the key figures to shape the 19th century. Napoleon was not only one of the greatest warlords in human history, but also one of its principal legislators. He founded the Code of Napoleon – France’s civil law – which laid the foundation for the entire west-European modern law. 

Bonaparte spread the advanced French Revolution ideas and ideals through his conquests; but, ironically, being a monarch suppressed them in France itself. 

He developed far-reaching military tactics and strategic ideas relevant even today.

Napoleon ruled France from 1799 to 1814, until he was forced to resign by UK-Russian-Prussian-Austrian coalition that conquered Paris. The coalition forces sent him to exile on the island of Elba. They allowed him to retain his royal title of ‘Emperor’ but determined that his empire would extend only to the 86sqm (224sqKm) island 

In 1815 Napoleon fled the island and marched on Paris. French military forces that were dispatched to arrest him happily joined their admired Emperor. Napoleon was joined by many former soldiers and volunteers. On March 20, 1815, he regained his crown.

100 days later, on June 18, 1815, the French army was defeated again by the European coalition, thus ending – this time for good – Napoleon’s rule. 

The British decided not to take any risks this time and sent Napoleon to the remote island of St. Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean, some 2,000 kilometers off the coast of Africa. There, Napoleon spent the rest of his life on that island.