Was Hitler’s No. 1 soldier an Israeli spy?

| David Lewis | History

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During WW2, SS-Obersturmbannführer Otto Skorzeny, commander of the SS special forces was referred by allied media as “The most dangerous man in Europe” and probably for good reason. He was in charge of the German equivalent to today’s USA Delta Force, Navy Seals, and Green Berets.

After the war, he managed to escape from an allied prison, apparently with the help of former SS men who were disguised as US military police. He settled in Spain under the auspices of Franco’s regime.

In the 50’ Skorzeny began consulting to Israel’s greatest enemy at that time – Egypt. In those days, Egypt employed German scientists – mostly former Nazis – to develop long-range missiles to be used against Israel.

In 1962, Skorzeny was recruited by the Israeli intelligence service, the ‘Mossad’. After the abduction of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann and his prosecution in Israel, Skorzeny feared a similar fate and therefore decided to cooperate with Israelis for immunity.
Skorzeny proved to be a very effective spy and had a crucial role in obstructing the Egyptian missile project.

He died of cancer in Madrid in 1975 as a full-fledged Nazi, showing neither remorse nor regret.
His funeral was attended not only by dozen of hailing Nazis but also by his ‘Mossad’ handlers who came to pay their respects… and for other purposes…

 

 

 

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And for all Otto-enthusiasts, here some more:
Skorzeny was born in Vienna, Austria. He was a noted fencer and engaged in fifteen personal combats. The tenth resulted in a wound that left a dramatic on his cheek, which became its hallmark. In 1931, he joined the Austrian Nazi Party. After the outbreak of World War II, in 1940, he volunteered for the SS Livestock Division, taking part in battles across Europe and the Eastern Front. After being wounded he moved to headquarters in Berlin, where he learned f commando combat. He teamed up with Ernest Kaltenbrunner and Walter Schellenberg and was assigned to head the SS commando unit. The first operation he commanded was to try to join forces with rebel tribes in Iran to sabotage the trans-Iranian railroad that led allied supplies to the Soviet Union. This operation has failed.

His most famous action was the rescue Italian tyrant Benito Mussolini from prison. In a first-of-its-kind airborne rescue operation, the German force landed with gliders in a downpour on a high mountain peak where Mussolini was imprisoned under heavy guard. Thanks to the successful operation, it is decorated with the Iron Cross Knights Cross and made him Hitler’s favorite.

And for all Otto-enthusiasts, here some more:
Skorzeny was born in Vienna, Austria. He was a noted fencer and engaged in fifteen personal combats. The tenth resulted in a wound that left a dramatic on his cheek, which became its hallmark. In 1931, he joined the Austrian Nazi Party. After the outbreak of World War II, in 1940, he volunteered for the SS Livestock Division, taking part in battles across Europe and the Eastern Front. After being wounded he moved to headquarters in Berlin, where he learned f commando combat. He teamed up with Ernest Kaltenbrunner and Walter Schellenberg and was assigned to head the SS commando unit. The first operation he commanded was to try to join forces with rebel tribes in Iran to sabotage the trans-Iranian railroad that led allied supplies to the Soviet Union. This operation has failed.

His most famous action was the rescue Italian tyrant Benito Mussolini from prison. In a first-of-its-kind airborne rescue operation, the German force landed with gliders in a downpour on a high mountain peak where Mussolini was imprisoned under heavy guard. Thanks to the successful operation, it is decorated with the Iron Cross Knights Cross and made him Hitler’s favorite.