Did the lawyers’ Bar Exam start as a drinking contest?

| Linda Brown | Word & Idioms

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The UK legal system applies a separation of roles – there are two kinds of lawyers: barristers and solicitors. Only a barrister may address the court.

In old times, barristers would run their offices in local bars. Hence, Bar-rister, hence, the Bar Exam.

I personally prefer my lawyer sober, but that’s just me.

Bonus Fact 1: Like barristers, ‘Mind your Ps & Qs comes’ comes from bar houses. Bartenders in England used to tell regular costumers that drank too much and lost their manners to mind their Ps & Qs – that is to say, pints and quarts. It was later shortened and used in other circumstances.

Bonus Fact 2: The term ‘Bathtub Gin’ origin lies deep within the happy 20’s prohibition times. Back then, gin was a favorite in the underground acholic establishments, as it was quick and easy to bootleg. The term bathtub gin was coined in reference the way bootleggers mixed the spirit – since the bottles were too tall for regular sinks, and had to be filled under a bathtub faucet.

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And for those who are keen to know more about UK’s law system, here is some more:

English law, otherwise known as Common law, is practiced in, full or partially, in many commonwealth countries, that is to say, countries that once were part of the British Empire.

Common law includes many principles that constitute a non-statutory law, namely a law not passed by parliament. The most important notion of common law is largely based on judges’ rulings on the precedent principle; The judiciary’s rulings constitute a law as much as the one created by the legislature.

Common law is one of the two most prevalent law-systems in the world. It is customary to present it as contradictory method to Continental Law which evolved in mainland Europe.

Common law developed in England through the ‘adversarial method’ – a legal method where the judge rules between two rival parties, on whom lays the burden of presenting the evidence. It is opposed to the ‘inquisitorial method’ – which is practiced in Continental law – in which the judge has an active role in locating the evidence and bringing them to court. 

Back in those days, when common law evolved, there were no written laws – neither by king or parliament. Hence, the judge was required to decide on custom, tradition, and precedent. This is called a casuistic inference – a conclusion based on the principle set in the previous case (precedent) 

In countries that do not follow common law, the laws are drawn up in files called codes (for example, “Codex Napoleon”), and a legislative procedure designed to regulate a particular branch of law is called ‘codification’.

And for those who are keen to know more about UK’s law system, here is some more:

English law, otherwise known as Common law, is practiced in, full or partially, in many commonwealth countries, that is to say, countries that once were part of the British Empire.

Common law includes many principles that constitute a non-statutory law, namely a law not passed by parliament. The most important notion of common law is largely based on judges’ rulings on the precedent principle; The judiciary’s rulings constitute a law as much as the one created by the legislature.

Common law is one of the two most prevalent law-systems in the world. It is customary to present it as contradictory method to Continental Law which evolved in mainland Europe.

Common law developed in England through the ‘adversarial method’ – a legal method where the judge rules between two rival parties, on whom lays the burden of presenting the evidence. It is opposed to the ‘inquisitorial method’ – which is practiced in Continental law – in which the judge has an active role in locating the evidence and bringing them to court. 

Back in those days, when common law evolved, there were no written laws – neither by king or parliament. Hence, the judge was required to decide on custom, tradition, and precedent. This is called a casuistic inference – a conclusion based on the principle set in the previous case (precedent) 

In countries that do not follow common law, the laws are drawn up in files called codes (for example, “Codex Napoleon”), and a legislative procedure designed to regulate a particular branch of law is called ‘codification’.