Did Jesus have a twin brother?

| Linda Brown | Word & Idioms

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As we all know, Judas Thomas was one of Jesus’s beloved twelve apostles. But – hold on to your seats and get this – originally Thomas was not a name at all, but rather an adjective meaning twin. Yap, Judas Thomas actually means ‘Judas the twin’.

The name Thomas derives from the Aramaic word Ta’oma’ and the Hebrew word Te’om, both meaning twin.

So, whose twin was he? – Some assert his appellation the ‘twin’ derives from the fact that he was the second Judas of the Apostles, the first being Judas Iscariot.   

Others contend he was a twin spirit of Jesus, looked very much like him, or …. was his brother!

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And that’s for all of you who want to know more about Judas Thomas:

The gospel according to John mentions Thomas is in three contexts: 

Thomas is first mentioned when Jesus seeks to return to Bethany (on the Mount of Olives) to revive Lazarus (John 11:16). The apostles warn him of the wrath of the people of Jerusalem and express their concern he could be stoned to death. Nonetheless, Jesus insists on returning to Jerusalem and Thomas, also known as Didymus, stands beside him and proclaims that all the apostles shall accompany Jesus to die with him. 

The second time Thomas is mentioned is in the Gospel of John 14:6. As the disciples sit for the Last Supper, Jesus tells them that they know where he is going to. Thomas is not satisfied with Jesus’s statement and asks for clarification. 

But most of Thomas’s publicity came from the revival scene, which received many artistic and cultural expressions, an event for which he was named forever – Doubtful Thomas. In John 20: 24-29, After Jesus’s resurrection, it is Thomas who refused to believe his eyes and acknowledge it is Jesus who stands before him.

According to the tradition of the churches of South India, the Apostle Thomas landed in 52 on Malabar Coast (south-west coast of the subcontinent). He preached in the region and founded there seven and a half churches that constitute Christianity in southern India. 

Thomas preached throughout the subcontinent and according to tradition, was executed a cave on “Mount Thomas” in Milpur (located on the eastern side of South India). His alleged remains are still displayed there at the St. Thomas Basilica in Chennai.

Indeed, until the Portuguese conquest of the area (16th century), Christians of that province were associated with the Assyrian Church of the East. This fact supports the assertion that if not Thomas himself then at least someone from the Holy Land region introduced Christianity to South India.

And that’s for all of you who want to know more about Judas Thomas:

The gospel according to John mentions Thomas is in three contexts: 

Thomas is first mentioned when Jesus seeks to return to Bethany (on the Mount of Olives) to revive Lazarus (John 11:16). The apostles warn him of the wrath of the people of Jerusalem and express their concern he could be stoned to death. Nonetheless, Jesus insists on returning to Jerusalem and Thomas, also known as Didymus, stands beside him and proclaims that all the apostles shall accompany Jesus to die with him. 

The second time Thomas is mentioned is in the Gospel of John 14:6. As the disciples sit for the Last Supper, Jesus tells them that they know where he is going to. Thomas is not satisfied with Jesus’s statement and asks for clarification. 

But most of Thomas’s publicity came from the revival scene, which received many artistic and cultural expressions, an event for which he was named forever – Doubtful Thomas. In John 20: 24-29, After Jesus’s resurrection, it is Thomas who refused to believe his eyes and acknowledge it is Jesus who stands before him.

According to the tradition of the churches of South India, the Apostle Thomas landed in 52 on Malabar Coast (south-west coast of the subcontinent). He preached in the region and founded there seven and a half churches that constitute Christianity in southern India. 

Thomas preached throughout the subcontinent and according to tradition, was executed a cave on “Mount Thomas” in Milpur (located on the eastern side of South India). His alleged remains are still displayed there at the St. Thomas Basilica in Chennai.

Indeed, until the Portuguese conquest of the area (16th century), Christians of that province were associated with the Assyrian Church of the East. This fact supports the assertion that if not Thomas himself then at least someone from the Holy Land region introduced Christianity to South India.