Did Africans beat Columbus to America?

| David Lewis | History

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At least according to Columbus himself, the answer is yes, yes and yes!

Columbus noted in his journal that Native Americans had confirmed that “black skinned people had come from the south-east in boats, trading in gold-tipped spears”.

An ancient connection between the two continents makes perfect sense, considering that Pyramids had been built both in Africa (Egypt) and Central America – and only there.

 

Pyramid in Mexico (source: wikimedia common)
Pyramid in Mexico (source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

Pyramids in Egypt, Africa (source: Wikimedia Commons)
Pyramids in Egypt, Africa (source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

Bonus Fact: while most of us were thought in school that Columbus did not set sails to find America, but rather a new route to India, new research suggests he knew exactly where he was sailing and intently misled King Ferdinand about his goal in order to convince him to fund the trip.

This new theory relies on Chinese scripts that prove that Chinese explorers mapped the Americas as early as 1418 and even left settlers along the west coast. The theory suggests that Columbus got hold o

of the Chinese maps.

Notably, it has been proven that by the time the Whiteman reached the continent, Chinese settlers in America had already blended in with the local Indian tribes.

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And for all Columbus enthusiasts, here is some more:
Assuming the abovementioned theory is wrong and that Columbus’s intention was indeed to find a new route to India,  the question that remains is – what made him think he can?

In a nutshell – he severely miscalculated the world’s diameter. During Columbus’s time (15th century) the geographical concept of the world was based on several errors:

Miscalculating Asia’s size – theologian and scientist Pierre Mae and geographer Tuscanelli – both highly regarded in that era – have greatly overestimated the extent of East Asia’s retirement.

Miscalculating the ocean’s size – Based on the second-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy the prevalent assumption at Columbus’s time was that Eurasian and African continents extend over half (180°) of the Earth’s circumference and that the other half was entirely occupied by the ocean. Columbus did not agree with these assertions and based his voyage on Phoenician Marinus of Tyre who calculation that the continent covers 225 ° while the sea only 135 ° – still too far from reality.

Another major mistake Columbus made was purely mathematical – while in preparation for the voyage, Columbus studied logs books and other documents written by Arab seamen and scholars, unfortunately, when converting the data he found he failed to take into account that Arab nautical miles are 1,830 meters, while the Italian nautical miles was much shorter and was set only 1,238 meters).

All of the abovementioned wrongful assumptions lead Columbus to calculated that the distance between the Canary Islands and Japan is about 3,700 miles, while the truth the distance is about 19,000 miles.

And for all Columbus enthusiasts, here is some more:
Assuming the abovementioned theory is wrong and that Columbus’s intention was indeed to find a new route to India,  the question that remains is – what made him think he can?

In a nutshell – he severely miscalculated the world’s diameter. During Columbus’s time (15th century) the geographical concept of the world was based on several errors:

Miscalculating Asia’s size – theologian and scientist Pierre Mae and geographer Tuscanelli – both highly regarded in that era – have greatly overestimated the extent of East Asia’s retirement.

Miscalculating the ocean’s size – Based on the second-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy the prevalent assumption at Columbus’s time was that Eurasian and African continents extend over half (180°) of the Earth’s circumference and that the other half was entirely occupied by the ocean. Columbus did not agree with these assertions and based his voyage on Phoenician Marinus of Tyre who calculation that the continent covers 225 ° while the sea only 135 ° – still too far from reality.

Another major mistake Columbus made was purely mathematical – while in preparation for the voyage, Columbus studied logs books and other documents written by Arab seamen and scholars, unfortunately, when converting the data he found he failed to take into account that Arab nautical miles are 1,830 meters, while the Italian nautical miles was much shorter and was set only 1,238 meters).

All of the abovementioned wrongful assumptions lead Columbus to calculated that the distance between the Canary Islands and Japan is about 3,700 miles, while the truth the distance is about 19,000 miles.