Why is it called a ‘Quarantine’?

| Linda Brown | Word & Idioms

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Long before any modern-day epidemic, it was the Black Plague that devastated the world. Like many present-day plagues, it originated in Asia and spread fast into Europe.

Unlike Corona, the Black Plague is estimated to have killed 30% to 60% of Europe’s population and reached a death toll of 200million people in Eurasia.

In an effort to contain the epidemic, the Venetian state enforced a prevention measure named ‘quaranta giorni’ – a 40-day isolation policy of ships and people before entering the city.

Sounds familiar? – Quaranta means 40 in Italian, hence ‘Quarantaine’.

Bonus fact 1: In 1346, during the siege over Caffa (in modern-day Ukraine) the Mongol army Kahn ordered to throw over the wall and into the besieged city corpus of soldiers infected by the plague. Some assert that this act introduced the black death to Europe.

Bonus fact 2: In 1763, during Pontiac’s Rebellion, British officer Jeffrey Amherst and Swiss-British officer Henry Bouquet gave Native American blankets deliberately infected with chickenpox. Chickenpox after Pontiac’s rebellion brought death upon 400,000 to 1.5 million Native Americans.

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And if you are into plagues as a bioweapon spread, this is for you:

 

Long before any modern-day epidemic, it was the Black Plague that devastated the world. Like many present-day plagues, it originated in Asia and spread fast into Europe.

Unlike Corona, the Black Plague is estimated to have killed 30% to 60% of Europe’s population and reached a death toll of 200million people in Eurasia.

In an effort to contain the epidemic, the Venetian state enforced a prevention measure named ‘quaranta giorni’ – a 40-day isolation policy of ships and people before entering the city.

Sounds familiar? – Quaranta means 40 in Italian, hence ‘Quarantaine’.

 

Bonus fact 1: In 1346, during siege over Caffa (in modern-day Ukraine) the Mongol army Kahn ordered to throw over the wall and into the besieged city corpus of soldiers infected by the plague. Some assert that this act introduced the black death to Europe.

 

Bonus fact 2: In 1763, during Pontiac’s Rebellion, British officer Jeffrey Amherst and Swiss-British officer Henry Bouquet gave Native American blankets deliberately infected with chickenpox. Chickenpox after Pontiac’s rebellion brought death upon 400,000 to 1.5 million Native Americans.

During the Chino-Japanese War (1937–1945), Unit 731 of the Japanese Imperial Army contaminated clothing and other supplies to the Chinese population with Cholera and anthrax claiming the lives of about 400,000 Chinese citizens.

After World War II, both the United States and the Soviet Union continued to develop biological weapons, although as far as we know never used them. Scientists who worked in USSR bioweapons programs stated that the Soviet effort was formidable and that large stocks of have been produced. It is assumed that during the chaos of USSR’s dissolution, some of those weapons fell into the wrong hands, gangsters who would be more than happy to sell it to terrorists for the right price.

And if you are into plagues as a bioweapon spread, this is for you:

 

Long before any modern-day epidemic, it was the Black Plague that devastated the world. Like many present-day plagues, it originated in Asia and spread fast into Europe.

Unlike Corona, the Black Plague is estimated to have killed 30% to 60% of Europe’s population and reached a death toll of 200million people in Eurasia.

In an effort to contain the epidemic, the Venetian state enforced a prevention measure named ‘quaranta giorni’ – a 40-day isolation policy of ships and people before entering the city.

Sounds familiar? – Quaranta means 40 in Italian, hence ‘Quarantaine’.

 

Bonus fact 1: In 1346, during siege over Caffa (in modern-day Ukraine) the Mongol army Kahn ordered to throw over the wall and into the besieged city corpus of soldiers infected by the plague. Some assert that this act introduced the black death to Europe.

 

Bonus fact 2: In 1763, during Pontiac’s Rebellion, British officer Jeffrey Amherst and Swiss-British officer Henry Bouquet gave Native American blankets deliberately infected with chickenpox. Chickenpox after Pontiac’s rebellion brought death upon 400,000 to 1.5 million Native Americans.

During the Chino-Japanese War (1937–1945), Unit 731 of the Japanese Imperial Army contaminated clothing and other supplies to the Chinese population with Cholera and anthrax claiming the lives of about 400,000 Chinese citizens.

After World War II, both the United States and the Soviet Union continued to develop biological weapons, although as far as we know never used them. Scientists who worked in USSR bioweapons programs stated that the Soviet effort was formidable and that large stocks of have been produced. It is assumed that during the chaos of USSR’s dissolution, some of those weapons fell into the wrong hands, gangsters who would be more than happy to sell it to terrorists for the right price.