Why was the croissant shaped after the Islamic crescent?

| John Anderson | Food

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In September 1683 a coalition of Christian kingdoms clashed with the mighty Ottoman, Muslim, empire at the gates of the Vienna.

On the verge of total defeat, a Polish-Christians force jumped to the rescue, turned the table around and transformed it into a great victory for the Christian coalition.

It is said that the croissant was shaped after the Muslim crescent and created to celebrate the defeat of the Ottoman attack on the city.

Bonus fact: When checking the Ottman camp, the coalition forces found a strange black liquid, we now know as coffee. This marked the beginning of the great invasion of the dark beverage into the continent. 

Conclusion: Historically, having a croissant without coffee is just wrong.

Ps: click here to find out which dish was invented to serve chronic gamblers.

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And for all French cuisine enthusiasts, here’s some more:

French cuisine is a collective name for various cooking styles whose main source is France and is considered one of the leading and influential cooking styles in the world. Different French cooking styles, or sub-cuisines,  have an affinity to the provinces in which they were developed and the types of food that characterize these regions: 

Bretonne – This region is the westernmost part of France and borders the Atlantic. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • Fish and seafood – considered to be the best in France.
  • Sheep with very juicy meat and slightly salty from eating grass growing near the sea.
  • Crepes – especially crepe made from buckwheat flour unique to Breton.

Normandy – It also borders the Atlantic and its fish and seafood are fine, but not unique to the region. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • The finest butter and cream spread.
  • Rich and high-fat cheeses like Camembert and Brei, which are actually named after towns in the area.
  • Apples and their products like alcoholic cider and Calvados.

Il de France – Il means Island and Il de France is an island located on the river Seine in the middle of Paris:

  • Parisian Onion Soup – A rich soup traditionally eaten by city workers.
  • Caviar – Served in Paris delicacies that specialize exclusively in caviar.
  • Coffee – some of the oldest still existing Coffee houses in the world are to be found in Paris. for Example Cafe de Flore.

Champagne – A small province located south of Belgium where the champagne is produced. Champagne cooking is not very common, mainly because of its expensive price. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • Beef Carbona.
  • Vegetables that are suitable for Champagne cold climates such as cabbage, leek, endive, potatoes, and beets.

Alsace-Laurent – the most eastern province of France. It borders Germany and was part of it until World War I. The influence of German cuisine is evident on Alsatian cuisine, and typical dishes in this area include:

  • Pickled cabbage – and foods based on it, most notably the Shukrot, a stew containing pickled cabbage and various cuts of meat, some of which are smoked.
  • Beer – As in German and Belgian cuisine, it is also common there to eat it with different stews.
  • Quiche Lorraine – Bacon and cream leek pie.
  • Gurztraminer – regional white wine.
  • Pot-of-mouth – meat soup
  • Bakauf – a stew containing cut potatoes, onion slices, beef and pork – cooked with a slow cooker.

Other provinces with distinct cuisines include Burgundy, Savoie Alps, Provance, Basque, and the Loire.

And for all French cuisine enthusiasts, here’s some more:

French cuisine is a collective name for various cooking styles whose main source is France and is considered one of the leading and influential cooking styles in the world. Different French cooking styles, or sub-cuisines,  have an affinity to the provinces in which they were developed and the types of food that characterize these regions: 

Bretonne – This region is the westernmost part of France and borders the Atlantic. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • Fish and seafood – considered to be the best in France.
  • Sheep with very juicy meat and slightly salty from eating grass growing near the sea.
  • Crepes – especially crepe made from buckwheat flour unique to Breton.

Normandy – It also borders the Atlantic and its fish and seafood are fine, but not unique to the region. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • The finest butter and cream spread.
  • Rich and high-fat cheeses like Camembert and Brei, which are actually named after towns in the area.
  • Apples and their products like alcoholic cider and Calvados.

Il de France – Il means Island and Il de France is an island located on the river Seine in the middle of Paris:

  • Parisian Onion Soup – A rich soup traditionally eaten by city workers.
  • Caviar – Served in Paris delicacies that specialize exclusively in caviar.
  • Coffee – some of the oldest still existing Coffee houses in the world are to be found in Paris. for Example Cafe de Flore.

Champagne – A small province located south of Belgium where the champagne is produced. Champagne cooking is not very common, mainly because of its expensive price. The typical dishes of the area include:

  • Beef Carbona.
  • Vegetables that are suitable for Champagne cold climates such as cabbage, leek, endive, potatoes, and beets.

Alsace-Laurent – the most eastern province of France. It borders Germany and was part of it until World War I. The influence of German cuisine is evident on Alsatian cuisine, and typical dishes in this area include:

  • Pickled cabbage – and foods based on it, most notably the Shukrot, a stew containing pickled cabbage and various cuts of meat, some of which are smoked.
  • Beer – As in German and Belgian cuisine, it is also common there to eat it with different stews.
  • Quiche Lorraine – Bacon and cream leek pie.
  • Gurztraminer – regional white wine.
  • Pot-of-mouth – meat soup
  • Bakauf – a stew containing cut potatoes, onion slices, beef and pork – cooked with a slow cooker.

Other provinces with distinct cuisines include Burgundy, Savoie Alps, Provance, Basque, and the Loire.