Which people spoke gibberish?

| Linda Brown | Communication

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In a way we do, all of us! – The ancient Greeks used the term barbarian to describe all non-Greek-speaking people.

That’s because the language they spoke sounded to Greeks like Gibberish represented by the sounds “bar bar bar”.

Now take a moment and guess what are the roots of Brabi…

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And for all of you language trivia-frickes, here’s some more:

There are about 10,000 human languages ​​worldwide and countless local dialects.

Most human languages ​​vocally manifested and produced by oral, nasal and throat cavities. Nonetheless, there are also a limited number of human languages ​​in which signs are expressed through hand gestures and facial expressions (sign languages), and are mostly created in communities where there is a high rate of deaf people.

Papua New Guinea has the largest linguistic diversity in the world, with no less than 820 different languages, most of which are spoken today and some are almost extinct. Because of the literacy Papuas low rates (30%-40%) it is difficult to document these languages ​​and, indeed, some are in danger of extinction.

Many animals use symbolic communication that allows even complex messages to be transmitted. Different animals have different symbolic systems, some of which are innate and some of which are acquired by learning. These communication systems are based on the auditory sense through sounds, movements, touch (the sense of touch) and smell (ie: urine). The messages conveyed to one another and their surroundings. These messages carry vital information and play a major role in animal existence as well as their ability to survive in the wild.

The number of species in nature is huge and many have complex and learned symbolic systems that deserve to be described as languages.

Some animals can acquire language in the laboratory conditions include gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees.

Nonetheless, while teaching sign language in the labs proved to be successful that is not the case with written or instrumentation-assisted language. However, animals that did learn a language in the lab preferred social and sexual individual-animals who also acquired their language. Moreover, they speak to themselves in sign language when they are alone.

And for all of you language trivia-frickes, here’s some more:

There are about 10,000 human languages ​​worldwide and countless local dialects.

Most human languages ​​vocally manifested and produced by oral, nasal and throat cavities. Nonetheless, there are also a limited number of human languages ​​in which signs are expressed through hand gestures and facial expressions (sign languages), and are mostly created in communities where there is a high rate of deaf people.

Papua New Guinea has the largest linguistic diversity in the world, with no less than 820 different languages, most of which are spoken today and some are almost extinct. Because of the literacy Papuas low rates (30%-40%) it is difficult to document these languages ​​and, indeed, some are in danger of extinction.

Many animals use symbolic communication that allows even complex messages to be transmitted. Different animals have different symbolic systems, some of which are innate and some of which are acquired by learning. These communication systems are based on the auditory sense through sounds, movements, touch (the sense of touch) and smell (ie: urine). The messages conveyed to one another and their surroundings. These messages carry vital information and play a major role in animal existence as well as their ability to survive in the wild.

The number of species in nature is huge and many have complex and learned symbolic systems that deserve to be described as languages.

Some animals can acquire language in the laboratory conditions include gorillas, bonobos, and chimpanzees.

Nonetheless, while teaching sign language in the labs proved to be successful that is not the case with written or instrumentation-assisted language. However, animals that did learn a language in the lab preferred social and sexual individual-animals who also acquired their language. Moreover, they speak to themselves in sign language when they are alone.