What’s the worst name ever given to a car?

| David Lewis | Marketing

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Well, that would probably be Chevy Nova.

In Spanish, ’no va’ means ‘won’t move’.

There are almost 500 million native Spanish speakers… oops…

 

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And for those of you who are Chevy Nova’s enthusiasts:

After the rear-engine Chevrolet Corvair was virtually knocked out by the conventional Ford Falcon in 1960, Chevrolet began working on a more conventional compact car that would eventually end up being the Chevy II.

The car was of semi-monocoque construction with a front chassis attached to the monocoque cabin and a rear section of the trunk. It was available in sedan versions of 4 and 2 doors, coupe 2 doors without stops, as well as convertible and family versions.

The 1962 Chevy II was produced in three series, the 100 Series, 300 Series and Nova 400 Series.

A 153-cubic-inch (2.51-liter) 4-cylinder engine developing 90 horsepower was the standard and a 194-cubic-inch (3.18 liters) 6-cylinder aligned with 120 horsepower was available.

The 6-cylinder was definitely the third generation of the engine, replacing the second-generation Stovebolt.

One of Chevy Nova’s main rival was the Chrysler Plymouth Valiant model, which was introduced to the public in late 1959 as 1960 models.

Although the Nova would not be originally available with a V8 option, its engine housing was perfectly set for such an engine. Indeed, It did not take long for Chevrolet V8 engines to be offered as options installed by an authorized dealer (between 1962 ~ 63), even adding the version with fuel injector available in the Corvette. The combination of easily available V8 engines and lightweight made the Nova a popular choice among runners.

In 1962 ~ 63, the Nova was available in a convertible version, and between 1962 ~ 65 in a two-door version without stops. Although the ‘hardtop’ was introduced when and pushed the model further.

The Super Sport option (RPO-Z03) was available for the first time in the Chevy II Nova 400 Series in 1963. It offered special emblems, instrument package, hubcaps, side moldings, armchair seats, and four-speed manual gearbox with lever to the floor. It was the only sport and convertible version available in the 400 Series coupe. As mentioned earlier, the Nova did not officially carry V8 engines, but it was very common, among fans, to change those 6 cylinders for small-block V8 engines. It was only in 1964, that the first Chevy II with an optional V8 engine was introduced. This was one of 195 hp (145 kilowatts) and 283 cubic inches (4.64 L). In 1965, a 327 cu in (5.36 L) V8 was also available with a power of 300 hp (220 kW).

1963 was the only year that Chevrolet built a convertible Nova SS since it suspended the convertible body style in the Chevrolet Nova in 1964. Soon, the Chevrolet Nova SS convertible (1963) became one of the most desirable cars in the United States.

The Chevy II / Nova of the first generation produced 1.25 million pieces in 6 years.

And for those of you who are Chevy Nova’s enthusiasts:

After the rear-engine Chevrolet Corvair was virtually knocked out by the conventional Ford Falcon in 1960, Chevrolet began working on a more conventional compact car that would eventually end up being the Chevy II.

The car was of semi-monocoque construction with a front chassis attached to the monocoque cabin and a rear section of the trunk. It was available in sedan versions of 4 and 2 doors, coupe 2 doors without stops, as well as convertible and family versions.

The 1962 Chevy II was produced in three series, the 100 Series, 300 Series and Nova 400 Series.

A 153-cubic-inch (2.51-liter) 4-cylinder engine developing 90 horsepower was the standard and a 194-cubic-inch (3.18 liters) 6-cylinder aligned with 120 horsepower was available.

The 6-cylinder was definitely the third generation of the engine, replacing the second-generation Stovebolt.

One of Chevy Nova’s main rival was the Chrysler Plymouth Valiant model, which was introduced to the public in late 1959 as 1960 models.

Although the Nova would not be originally available with a V8 option, its engine housing was perfectly set for such an engine. Indeed, It did not take long for Chevrolet V8 engines to be offered as options installed by an authorized dealer (between 1962 ~ 63), even adding the version with fuel injector available in the Corvette. The combination of easily available V8 engines and lightweight made the Nova a popular choice among runners.

In 1962 ~ 63, the Nova was available in a convertible version, and between 1962 ~ 65 in a two-door version without stops. Although the ‘hardtop’ was introduced when and pushed the model further.

The Super Sport option (RPO-Z03) was available for the first time in the Chevy II Nova 400 Series in 1963. It offered special emblems, instrument package, hubcaps, side moldings, armchair seats, and four-speed manual gearbox with lever to the floor. It was the only sport and convertible version available in the 400 Series coupe. As mentioned earlier, the Nova did not officially carry V8 engines, but it was very common, among fans, to change those 6 cylinders for small-block V8 engines. It was only in 1964, that the first Chevy II with an optional V8 engine was introduced. This was one of 195 hp (145 kilowatts) and 283 cubic inches (4.64 L). In 1965, a 327 cu in (5.36 L) V8 was also available with a power of 300 hp (220 kW).

1963 was the only year that Chevrolet built a convertible Nova SS since it suspended the convertible body style in the Chevrolet Nova in 1964. Soon, the Chevrolet Nova SS convertible (1963) became one of the most desirable cars in the United States.

The Chevy II / Nova of the first generation produced 1.25 million pieces in 6 years.