Is slavery practiced only by mankind?

| David Lewis | Nature

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When the question of who were the first to enslave is asked, most people point to the Portuguese, the Arabas, the Dutch, Englishmen, or the Chinese. But that’s not the case at all – It was ants and it began millions of years ago!  

Polyergus Lucidus ants raid Formica ants nests’, steal their cocoons, and raise them as slaves. After emerging in the slave-maker nest, unaware of their foreign origin, slave workers work as if they were in their own colony. Namely, they know no better and are convinced they are Polyergus Lucidus ants. 

The slave-makers – or parasites – themselves concentrate exclusively on replenishing the labor force from neighboring host nests.

Yap, humanity did not invent inhumanity….

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And for those who want to know about slavery-history in America:

Even before European settlers introduced slavery to America, many Native American tribes were engaged in human trafficking among themselves. They used to abduct members of other tribes for worship and sacrifice purposes; or, sometimes, to find a mate for the tribe’s chief.

During the 16th century, a new phenomenon took place: Slaves who were originally from different places from Africa found themselves unable to communicate in their new “home” since they spoke different languages. Thus, The slave communities developed local cultures, retained many original customs, and also developed additional customs. They developed various Creole language, musical styles, dance styles, and other cultural products based on a connection between African, indigenous, and even gentlemen’s cultures. The capoeira from Brazil, for example, evolved because they were forbidden to the slaves to practice fighting, and so the slaves incorporated music and dance movements into the martial arts so that they did not arouse suspicion while practicing.

With the conquest of South America, the conquistadors attempted to harness Indians to slavery, but these died in droves from European-borne illnesses. Also, upon their conversion to Christianity, they were granted the protection of the Spanish Crown and the Church. Alas, the slave traders turn to Africa to meet the evergrowing demand from the New World. In turn, the high demand for slaves resulted in a significant increase in trade and devastating damage to the social fabric of West Africa.

There is a claim that the rise in sugar consumption in Europe and the addiction of Europeans to sweets have created peak demand for sugarcane crops, land, and working hands.

Many slaves-to-be were abducted by local merchants, rival tribes, or tragically, sometimes, even sold by their family members.

About 15% of slaves did not survive the journey of crossing the Atlantic. According to the study, a total of 10,702,656 slaves arrived in America.

And for those who want to know about slavery-history in America:

Even before European settlers introduced slavery to America, many Native American tribes were engaged in human trafficking among themselves. They used to abduct members of other tribes for worship and sacrifice purposes; or, sometimes, to find a mate for the tribe’s chief.

During the 16th century, a new phenomenon took place: Slaves who were originally from different places from Africa found themselves unable to communicate in their new “home” since they spoke different languages. Thus, The slave communities developed local cultures, retained many original customs, and also developed additional customs. They developed various Creole language, musical styles, dance styles, and other cultural products based on a connection between African, indigenous, and even gentlemen’s cultures. The capoeira from Brazil, for example, evolved because they were forbidden to the slaves to practice fighting, and so the slaves incorporated music and dance movements into the martial arts so that they did not arouse suspicion while practicing.

With the conquest of South America, the conquistadors attempted to harness Indians to slavery, but these died in droves from European-borne illnesses. Also, upon their conversion to Christianity, they were granted the protection of the Spanish Crown and the Church. Alas, the slave traders turn to Africa to meet the evergrowing demand from the New World. In turn, the high demand for slaves resulted in a significant increase in trade and devastating damage to the social fabric of West Africa.

There is a claim that the rise in sugar consumption in Europe and the addiction of Europeans to sweets have created peak demand for sugarcane crops, land, and working hands.

Many slaves-to-be were abducted by local merchants, rival tribes, or tragically, sometimes, even sold by their family members.

About 15% of slaves did not survive the journey of crossing the Atlantic. According to the study, a total of 10,702,656 slaves arrived in America.